Welcome to ReadingPerformanceSystem.com!
Why Reading Performance System?
Because everyone needs to read better!
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RPS Approach & Purpose

  • RPS represents a new paradigm for reading instruction and practice based on the latest brain research. We are redefining how people think about reading, how they talk about reading, and how they read.
  • According to researchers, two-thirds of the population is born without adequate access to the motor, sensory, and cognitive skills necessary for reading well. Therefore, only one-third of the population is natural readers. Whether you are a natural reader or not, you can benefit from using RPS to strengthen your foundational reading skills.
  • The brain pathways for verbal reading and sight reading are different. The pathway for verbal reading, which includes both silent-verbal reading (aka sub-vocal reading) and oral reading (aka reading out loud), is much slower than the pathway for silent-sight reading. As a result, sensory decoding of words for silent-verbal reading must be done serially and pass through the verbal centers of the brain, whereas sensory decoding for silent-sight reading can be done in parallel and follow the most direct path to the primary visual cortex . RPS provides exercises that help strengthen silent-sight reading skills by strengthening neuronal connections.
  • There is a level and quality of sensory processing and cognitive awareness necessary for sight reading that is quantitatively and qualitatively different from verbal reading. These sightreading neural pathways must be developed to the point that they are easily accessible, habituated, and can be called upon at will. RPS does not eliminate the ability to read verbally from the reading toolbox if that is the preferred method for certain kinds of written materials. RPS exercises add sight reading tools to the reading toolbox by developing their neural connectivity in the brain and habituating them.
  • RPS is very easy to use. After you login, all you have to do is upload your Reading Material text filesby clicking the Upload Reading Material link on the homepage, then clicking the RPS Exercise you want to perform. On the Exercise Page, just click the Choose button to select your Reading Material from the list. Then, click the Continue to Exercise button to begin improving your reading skills.
  • The more you do, the easier it gets. When you do RPS exercises, you are developing neural pathways for those skills. This requires practice over time. If you do 10-20 minutes of practice every day, you will begin to see the improvements in your performance in using RPS exercises and in your regular reading.
  • We recommend using RPS 10-20 minutes or more every day for 21 days to start. This is widely accepted as the time necessary to establish new habits. Once you establish the habit of using RPS regularly, the more you use it, the more you will improve.
  • When you start using RPS, if you experience, "It makes my eyes feel funny," or "It gives me a headache," or "I can't do it that long," you are in serious need of RPS. It will get easier.
  • As with all RPS exercises, you select your own Reading Material, which increases interest and focus. You can kill two birds with one stone by uploading reading you have to do for school or for work. Simply copy your reading material into a .txt file and upload your .txt file into RPS. (Microsoft Notepad will convert any clipboard content into text, just copy and paste it from you source document into Notepad. If your source document is in another application, most of them allow you to save files in .txt format.) Note to Teachers: You can upload assigned reading material through the Teacher Control Panel.
  • For ease of use, all RPS default settings were carefully chosen so the average person can begin using the exercises by choosing their Reading Material and clicking the Continue to Exercise button without making any other adjustment to the settings. As you will see below, we encourage RPS users to find the settings that maximize their performance.

Column Exercise (CE) [Click to Expand]

  • The Column Exercise is primarily designed to improve motor skills, but it also helps improve sensory skills and once these motor and sensory skills are mastered, helps cognitive skills as well.
  • As much as 90 percent of the reading we do requires silent-sight reading, instantaneous recognition and understanding of words (word processing at brain speed), large eye movement jumps (macro-saccades), word chunking (parallel word processing), and scanning (rapid discrimination and differentiation of information).

Expanding Square Exercise (ESE) [Click to Expand]

  • The Expanding Square Exercise is primarily designed to improve sensory skills, specifically Peripheral Visual Perception (PVP). When it is mastered, it helps improve cognitive skills as well.
  • Expanding your Peripheral Visual Perception (PVP) is important because the more words you can decode, both horizontally and vertically, the more information you can absorb with each eye fixation. The Expanding Square Exercise starts with the words together at the center of your vision, then expands them into your peripheral vision. This is a kind of reverse engineering of your brains ability to decode words in your peripheral vision by having it decode those words in the region of your clearest vision. The brain already knows what words are there and learns to perceive words better in the periphery.

Chunk Exercise (ChE) [Click to Expand]

  • The Chunk Exercise is designed to improve both motor and sensory skills and when it is master, cognitive skills as well. This exercise is the most like normal reading. The Reading Material is displayed as you would normally see it and the highlighter highlights the words in chunks.
  • When reading, your eye must be stopped or fixated in order for the eye to clearly see the words and the brain to properly decode it. When you fixate on each word, your eyes are doing more work than they need to and this is a very slow way to read. If you can read two words at once, you are not only cutting your eye strain in half, you are absorbing twice as much information in the same amount of time. And, you can see how chunking three and four words at a time, produces even greater benefit. You should focus on eye movement, seeing the words clearly will follow proper eye movement and meaning will follow seeing the words clearly. The Chunk Exercise helps develop eye tracking and synchronization skills and trains the eyes to move fluidly across the page under normal reading conditions. This is an excellent exercise to use to catch up on your reading.

Numbers Exercise (NE) [Click to Expand]

  • The Numbers Exercise is primarily designed to improve sensory skills, specifically Peripheral Visual Perception (PVP) and when it is mastered, cognitive skills as well.
  • Expanding your Peripheral Visual Perception (PVP) is important because the more words you can decode, both horizontally and vertically, the more information you can absorb with each eye fixation. The Numbers Exercise starts with 4x4matrix of 16 numbers. One of the numbers appears in a red dot in the center. You stare at the number in the center and use your peripheral vision to click on the same number in the matrix. When you click all 16 numbers, the exercise ends. Numbers were chosen for this exercise because number symbols are easily decoded by the brain. The goal is to be able to see all 16 numbers simultaneously.

Single Eye Fixation Exercise (SEFE) [Click to Expand]

  • The Single Eye Fixation Exercise is primarily designed to improve sensory skills, specifically Peripheral Visual Perception (PVP) and the Magnocellular and Parvocellular Systems for visual processing. When it is mastered, it helps improve cognitive skills as well.
  • Like its name, when doing the Single Eye Fixation Exercise, you will fix your eyes in one position as the words of the passage appear on the screen. The magnocellular system is a pathway of fast acting neurons that transmit general information about what is seen. The parvocellular system is a slower acting pathway that transmits more detailed information about what is seen. The Single Eye Fixation Exercise eliminates processing defects due to motor functioning and flashes words in rapid succession thus causing the magnocellular and parvocellular systems to fire repeatedly. This also exercises the “clearing” function in the rods and cones that some scientists believe contributes to dyslexia. The Single Eye Fixation Exercise can be set to increase the number of words displayed horizontally and vertically to help increase your Peripheral Visual Perception (PVP). This is an excellent exercise to use to catch up on your reading.

Word Search Exercise (WSE) [Click to Expand]

  • The Word Search Exercise is designed to exercise all motor, sensory, and cognitive skills at the same time. Warning: The Word Search Exercise can be addictive. Do not neglect the other exercises and keep in mind that the other exercises will help increase your performance on the Word Search Exercise.
  • The Word Search Exercise puts it all of the skills together, fluid eye movements in all directions, sensory decoding, and cognitive recognition. It also helps develop word visualization. You choose the Number of Words to search and the Passage Length and try to find and click on all of the words in the set Time Limit. Increasing the Number of Words and Passage Length increases the difficulty. Try different search patterns, left to right, right to left, top to bottom, bottom to top, S curves, W curves, and clockwise and counter-clockwise spirals. As your motor and sensory skills improve and your peripheral visual perception and ability to visualize words increases, the words will “start jumping off the page at you. You will notice that the words in the passage are not displayed in the order in which they appear in the passage you uploaded. This is done to eliminate cognitive processes for comprehension, but your vocabulary will still be in effect.

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